Urge Congress to Enact Positive Immigration Reform

Send a message to both your Senator & Representative. Scroll through the full page to send both messages.

Message to U.S. Senators:

As a Catholic and your constituent, I write to urge your full support for enactment this year of immigration reform legislation that would secure a stable legal status for Dreamers, Temporary Protected Status (TPS)/Deferred Enforced Departure (DED) holders, migrant agricultural workers, and other undocumented essential workers.

The U.S. House of Representatives paved the way for Senate action by passing on a bipartisan basis H.R. 6, the American Dream & Promise Act, and H.R. 1603, the Farm Workforce Modernization Act. I am pleased that the Senate has just adopted a budget resolution that paves the way for including these and other immigration provisions in a budget reconciliation measure. I urge you to follow through on the budget resolution by including provisions in the forthcoming budget reconciliation bill that would secure a stable legal status for Dreamers, TPS and DED holders, migrant agricultural workers, and other undocumented essential workers.

Enactment of legislation this year is essential for all of these groups mentioned, but it is especially critical for Dreamers, given the unfortunate ruling on July 16 from a district court in Texas that prevents new DACA applicants from having their applications processed and threatens the futures of those currently receiving DACA protection.

American Catholics have been working toward immigration reform for decades. Disagreements about specific aspects of immigration policy should not stand in the way of relief for those already living as Americans in practice, if not on paper.

Millions living in the U.S today without legal status have been doing so for years, if not decades, and have established strong community ties. Many of those without legal status or access to permanent residency have U.S.-citizen children, homes, and businesses. Catholic teaching affirms a nation’s right to maintain its borders and regulate immigration. At the same time, it is contrary to Catholic teaching to have a “double society”, one “visible” with rights and one “invisible” without rights, unable to fully integrate. This is especially true when so many have committed themselves to the wellbeing of others and are simultaneously excluded from almost all benefit programs based on their status as undocumented, as we’ve seen throughout the COVID-19 pandemic.

Both the moral and economic rationales for reform are clear. The time for positive immigration reform is now.

Message to U.S. Representatives

As a Catholic and your constituent, I was very happy to see the bipartisan passage of H.R. 6, the American Dream and Promise Act, and H.R. 1603, the Farm Workforce Modernization Act, by the U.S. House of Representatives in March, which together would secure a stable legal status for Dreamers, Temporary Protected Status (TPS)/Deferred Enforced Departure (DED) holders and migrant agricultural workers.

While I am disappointed that the Senate has not yet acted on these bills, I am pleased that the Senate has just adopted a budget resolution that paves the way for including these and other immigration provisions in a budget reconciliation measure. I urge the House to include similar provisions in its budget resolution and to then follow through by including provisions from H.R. 6, H.R. 1603, and measures to secure a stable legal status for other undocumented essential workers in its budget reconciliation bill.

Enactment of legislation this year is essential for all of these groups mentioned, but it is especially critical for Dreamers, given the unfortunate ruling on July 16 from a district court in Texas that prevents new DACA applicants from having their applications processed and threatens the futures of those currently receiving DACA protection.

American Catholics have been working toward immigration reform for decades. The 117th Congress has an opportunity to address immigration in a positive, productive, and forward-looking way. Disagreements about specific aspects of immigration policy should not stand in the way of relief for those already living as Americans in practice, if not on paper.

Millions living in the United States today without legal status have been doing so for years, if not decades, and have established strong community ties. Many of those without legal status or access to permanent residency have U.S.-citizen children, homes, and businesses. They serve as leaders in their faith communities, schools, and other institutions. Catholic teaching affirms a nation’s right to maintain its borders and regulate immigration.

At the same time, it is contrary to Catholic teaching to have a “double society”, one “visible” with rights and one “invisible” without rights, unable to fully integrate. This is especially true when so many have committed themselves to the wellbeing of others and are simultaneously excluded from almost all benefit programs based on their status as undocumented, as we’ve seen throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. This is to say nothing of the billions of dollars in federal, state, and local taxes paid by undocumented immigrants, as well as all those who serve in our nation’s armed forces, some of whom are then subject to deportation.

Both the moral and economic rationales for reform are clear. We cannot delay any further. The time for positive immigration reform is now.